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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent man, correct? >> he yes, very much so. he has to know the track is he on is going to cause irreparable har
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
. and as it happened -- and i was involved in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that, reca -- rally wa private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. any time republicans try to beat up on a clinton, it's always great tv, especially when they get whopped like they did today. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> for me, this is not just a matter of policy, it's personal. >> secretary of state hillary clinton rips open the right wing attack on benghazi. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. >> and knocks down hack -- >> because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided they would go kill some americans. >> -- after hack -- >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to f
wrong about women getting the right to vote, and wrong about civil rights, wrong about vietnam, wrong about weapons of mass destruction in iraq. after being wrong about that, and that is just the tip, after being wrong about that, conservatives would have some self doubt about some things. but hard headedness is what makes them conservatives. it is what makes bill o'reilly bill o'reilly. bill o'reilly and his reaction to the inaugural address and his criticism of the inaugural address is in the rewrite tonight. that is coming up. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> the court said in a 7 to 2 decision that in the first three months of pregnancy, only the woman and her physician may decide whet
the right to vote, and wrong about civil rights, wrong about vietnam, wrong about weapons of mass destruction in iraq. after being wrong about that, and that is just the tip, after being wrong about that, conservatives would have some self doubt about some things. but hard headedness is what makes them conservatives. it is what makes bill o'reilly bill o'reilly. bill o'reilly and his reaction to the inaugural address and his criticism of the inaugural address is in the rewrite tonight. that is coming up. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. . >>> the court said in a 7 to 2 decision that in the first three months of pregnancy, only the woman and her physician may decide whether or not she may have an abortion. >> it me
will lead us in the invocation. >> the farmer chair of the naacp, widow of slain civil rights leader edgar medgar evers 50 years ago this year. >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama, we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces; blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit o
. that he also spoke up boldly for equality, human rights, civil rights for all americans. i remember he said, and you may recall, too, mr. speaker, he said, he said, we will never forget, you know, stonewall, cynical falls and selma. these are three iconic moments in civil rights history when he talked about the women's right movement, gay rights movement and african-american movements for civilritis. but they ale added up to one thing which is that an american is an american is an american, doesn't matter what your color is, what your sex is, who you love and want to be with, what matters are that you are an american and entitled to the full protection of the law in these united states. i think it was very important for him to do so. it represented an evolutionary moment in american mystery that a president, being nag rated into his second term, -- being inaugurated into his second term, would stand up and say civil and human rights for all people. i thought it was a great moment and found myself cheering even though i hadn't planned on doing so. but he didn't stop there. he specifical
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce returning four years later, this time, to sing the national anthem. ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ >> reporter: and as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment. one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: and as the first couple made their way back to the white house,
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
. that was a key victory for civil rights. poll taxes were an essential part of southern state's strategy to block voting. du
are listening to civil right activists saying the country is not as polarized and keep it in perspective but i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislateively, strike while the iron is hot. traditionally for all presidents, right now. it is the first year of their second term. remember, we had six-year itch. getting to finally the third cycle, 2014, you know, generally the minority -- the house of republicans expecting to gain seats because there's a six-year itch with the presidency and then a lame duck presidency after then and so the time to pass legislation, to have a legacy piece in the next two years and really this year. >> i'll also jump in and say that there's so many x factors out there right now. the arab spring i think we think it's a good thing right now but we don't know. we don't know what will happen in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> just a year or two talking about al qaeda being decimated and now algeria and mali and libya and others. >> i think from a foreign policy standpoint, the a
presidents? >> the temptation is to say yes, although we are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is g
the pick of every darn civilization on the planet. >> right, pick work dogs, not lazy dogs from those donor countries. congressman king said later his remarks were meant as a compliment. charming. so there has been an evolution by the republican party and it's not because rick perry accused anyone of not having a heart. senator mccain, how about some of that famous straight talk? >> i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. >> now, losing dramatically. i'm not so sure about that. mitt romney only lost by 44 points among latino voters, a hair's breath really. if republicans think the latino vote should be theirs, they may want to revisit their hardline party platform which reads in part, we oppose any form of amnesty for those who, by intentionally violating the law, disadvantaged those who have obeyed it, granting amnesty only rewards and encourageags more l breaking. there is no indication that the republican base is on board with any of th
earlier that you made a point of noticing how he drew the issue of gay rights right into civil rights and across history even as he goes now -- >> and women's rights. >> and women's rights. >> and it was a beautiful thing. that's part of the legacy of what this president is overseeing. this major demographic and cultural shift in our country. for him to bring that in as part of the inaugural address, it was very important from a historical perspective. >> just as they prepare to sit and prepare for the parade as it passes the reviewing stand, vice president joe biden giggling and talking -- oh, no, they are now sitting because the president has decided to take his seat. i was struck also, ari, by this comment the president made about his oath. when he said, this is an oath to god and country, not to party and faction. again absolutely eviscerating what has been an agenda by his opponents not to concern itself with country but to pursue anything that he wished to pass legislatively and attack it for purely partisan reasons. >> yeah. i thought that was striking. i thought it was asserti
are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is going to be torn back to the middle east. it just will. my pr
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
to protecting our citizens from harm, guarding against civil rights violations in combating guns, gang and drug fueled violence that's too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is were up against. not only because your alarmist statistics are the news stories, but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize, as i do -- most importantly, you recognize, as i do come up in a public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need to secure the results that are community deserves on our own. this is particularly true when it comes to gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every time represented here and about which many view have long been passionate. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room has joined with those of us in the justice department to support law-enforcement and strengthen anti-violence initiatives, especially as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horrific event in newton, connecticut. you've heard from citizens and colleagu
passage of the historic civil rights laws. we are honored to have with us a colleague, congressman john lewis, a speaker at that historic march. [applause] ongressman lewis' life exemplifies the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about what so we can all recognize you. [applause] -- take a bow so that we can all srecognize you. behind us, the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is at niagara falls. 6.is was painted in 1850 sike for me, niagara falls never fails to inspire a tremendous all of the natural beauty of our country. then and now, the mighty falls symbolize the grandeur, power, and possibility of america. i want to thank my former senate partner, hillary clinton for allowing us to borrow this beautiful painting from the state department collection. [applause] but frankly, we are not here for the paintings, we are here for the food. while the theme of today's ceremony is based in america's future, today's menu could be labeled face in america's food. from the new england lobster, to the south dakota bison, to the wonderful new york
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
for solving the unsolved civil rights crimes or worked with a guy that was actually trying to do that and i blocked it until i could make it effective was demonized, but those words hurt, but they are not true. so if you feel good about yourself, you know, try to do the right thing even though it means you're going to take all sorts of hits. the crime, all of the big fox network people came after me because i held that up until we had a clearer oversight and we could see what we were doing. i have several areas like that. but i'm kind of used to doing it. i'm pretty careful. i think every penny that we spend ought to be spent right. i don't think we ought to waste a penny so i don't mind seeking heat asking questions and taking the time to try to figure out where we are going to spend the money and whether or not it is to be spent effectively and whether or not we will have the transparency to see whether it is spent effectively. >> host: tom coburn as in his second term as a senator to read this is your final term. why is this up? >> guest: 16. >> host: and no way you are going to run agai
time is to put the past behind us. let's march arm in arm with the new civil rights movement to say that we as a nation can all stand for the beautiful gift of life. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. i send to the desk a privileged report from the committee on rules for filing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: report to accompany house resolution 39, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 325, to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the united states government until may 19, 2013, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. sessions: mr. speaker, i move that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands it's just --
-- a greater embrace of economic freedom as well as civil rights and we will continue to do that. and we will also do it in a way that focuses on the president's primary responsibility when it comes to foreign policy which is the safety and security of the united states and the american people. >> do you have a reaction to congressman paul ryan saying that the president needs a strongman argument in his inaugural address when he talked about the fact that the united states is not a nation of takers. congressman ryan said that the president misconstrued what he meant, what ryan meant when he used that term? a nation of takers? >> the president mentioned chairman ryan, but i mean, that phrase has been used by a number of republicans including paul ryan. the president's point was that these programs, social security and medicare in particular, have been enormously valuable to seniors in our country and to providing the security that has allowed for stronger economic growth and stronger job creation and a stronger middle class. i mean, the facts and figures on what the plight of the -- polit
. >> and so the killing just continues on the ground indefinitely, right? >> alas, and do we send in the marines or whatever we send in or we bomb them. >> and we get in the middle of a civil war and, of course, ends badly. and the region erupts. the russians. it seems to me that it's not in the russians' best interests in the long run to continue standing beside a tyrant who seems to me, if the past is prologue, cannot survive this in the long run. >> i think you're right in terms of the interests. but there is a peculiar aspect, namely putin's personality and personal obsessions. this is a man driven by nostalgia and resentment. he literally hates the fact that the soviet empire collapsed. he wants to recreate it. and he may be calculating that if we get bogged down in iran and in the region, he'll have an opening to crack down on something very important to europe and to us, georgia and as asser b azerbaijan. >> talking about the president needing more engagement, getting into areas where he can have a real impact, what does that look like, do you think, in this second term? wh
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)